Does a virgin need a Pap smear? | Go Ask Alice! - pap smear virgin

Category

pap smear virgin - Pap Smear New Guidelines: Does it pertain to Virgins? - Reproductive System Question


Are Pap Smears Necessary For Virgin Women? Pap smears are often unnecessary for true virgin women unless they have smoked in the past (based on some studies) or their mother took DES (also known as diethylstilbestrol) during pregnancy between - to prevent miscarriage and premature delivery. Does a virgin need a Pap smear? Dear Alice, Does a virgin need to have a Pap smear? Is cervical cancer the only disease a Pap smear detects? What are the means of contracting cervical cancer and any other possible diseases detected by the Pap smear? — New at this.

I was wondering if the new guidelines for pap smears pertain to virgins. I am a virgin in my mid 20s and I never had a pap smear. My doctor told me in the past that I did not need a pap smear because I am not sexually active. However, now my doctor told me about the new guidelines and told me that I Author: Courtneysunday. Apr 25,  · I think you are confusing a gynecological exam with a pap smear. A pap smear is just a part of the gyn exam. After the doctor puts the speculum in, they will take samples of your cervix and that is just one of them. You probably shouldn't feel it too much. The speculum probably shouldn't hurt to much either--even if you are a virgin.

Jan 03,  · If you are a virgin, you don't really need a pap smear anyway. In the UK, if you never have sex, you never have a pap smear because over 99% of cervical cancers (what pap smears look for) are caused by HPV infection, and you won't get an HPV infection if you aren't having aladura.infoers: 2. Aug 25,  · oh my goodness. I am a 23 year virgin, yes they do exist, but my period has been irregular for years, and i have been having other problems because of my irregularity. TMI, oh well to bad, lol. I already feel kinda lame for being a virgin, but today .

The USPSTF recommends screening for cervical cancer in women age 21 to 65 years with cytology (Pap smear) every 3 years or, for women ages 30 to 65 years who want to lengthen the screening.